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Rwanda Kinini Cooperative Rwanda Kinini Cooperative

Rwanda Kinini Cooperative

$19.95 per bag
Grind
Description
  • Country – Rwanda
  • Region – Northern Province, Rulindo District
  • Farm- Kinini Tumba Village (A cooperative with 268 members)
  • Varietal – Bourbon (pronounced burr-bone)
  • Elevation – 1800 to 2200 Meters (5900 to 7200 feet)
  • Process – Fully Washed   
  • Roast –  Light

Cupping notes of lemon zest, milk chocolate and apricot.  Zoka Cupping Score: 88

This coffee was fully washed for 24 to 36 hours. After soaking, the coffee was shade-dried on beds protected from the rain.

The varietal is Bourbon, one of the oldest species of Arabica. These trees often don’t produce a lot of cherries, but typically produce sweet coffees. Harvest for these trees is in March, April and May. 

Kinini Cooperative has 268 members, (85% are women), growing throughout one village, called Tumba, located in the Northern Province of Rwanda. Kinini translates to “this big thing right here” and celebrates the collaboration of growers pooling their efforts. 

Kinini Cooperative was founded in 2014 in hopes of having generational impact on the community without having to continually fundraise for aid projects. Kinini Cooperative began by providing coffee trees, technical support and organization to farmers within the region who wanted to join the co-op. In return the farmers had to bring the fruit from these trees to the Kinini washing station, at which time they would be paid. The parcels leased for this project were for the most part, on yet unused land.  The Coop built a washing station and an export company to sell the coffee. Ten percent of the profits go directly to developmental education and healthcare projects back in the community.  In 2017, three years after planting, Kinini had their first large harvest.

Watch Zoka Founder/CEO, Jeff Babcock, cupping the Rwanda Kinini Cooperative here.

Photo: Kinini Cooperative member hand-sorting cherries at the Tumba Village collection site.  

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